A Homemade Life
Welcome to Homemade Life.

To take full advantage of everything offered by our forum, please log in if you are already a member or join our community if not ....

Chilli-head
Who is online?
In total there are 3 users online :: 0 Registered, 0 Hidden and 3 Guests

None

Most users ever online was 62 on 10th April 2015, 8:24 am
Latest topics
» What arts and craft things have you been making lately?
by FloBear 9th December 2017, 6:47 pm

» What have I done in the workshop today?
by Ploshkin 9th December 2017, 6:23 pm

» Irish Wheaten Bread
by Ploshkin 9th December 2017, 3:08 pm

» What are you harvesting today?
by Ploshkin 9th December 2017, 1:52 pm

» Best before ...
by FloBear 8th December 2017, 2:28 pm

» Armchair gardening in December
by freebird 4th December 2017, 11:11 pm

» Autumn sowing in the November Garden
by Ploshkin 3rd December 2017, 3:46 pm

» Seed Banks and reliable suppliers
by Chilli-head 19th November 2017, 9:05 pm

» No-dig gardening & weed control
by freebird 17th November 2017, 5:10 pm

» Homemade onion sets
by freebird 17th November 2017, 7:50 am

» New arrivals
by FloBear 5th November 2017, 4:26 pm

» Wrapping up in the October garden
by freebird 30th October 2017, 12:41 pm

» Excellent publication
by Dandelion 18th October 2017, 5:07 pm

» Masaledar Sem (spicy green beans)
by freebird 15th October 2017, 8:08 pm

» Autumn planting vegetables
by freebird 7th October 2017, 12:58 pm

» Greek village bread
by Chilli-head 5th October 2017, 1:57 pm

» Passata machine
by Ploshkin 4th October 2017, 12:21 pm

» Bad press for woodburners
by freebird 29th September 2017, 7:20 pm

» Reflections on the seaon 2017
by freebird 28th September 2017, 9:35 pm

» The September garden
by FloBear 21st September 2017, 8:59 pm

Statistics
We have 631 registered users
The newest registered user is dreamcb77

Our users have posted a total of 44926 messages in 2335 subjects
Similar topics
HML on FaceBook
RSS feeds



Donate to our Charity
The Homemade life supports Kiva - microloans for people in developing countries working to change their lives.  These loans are repaid to our KIVA account, so your donation is used many times to help different people - literally the gift that keeps on giving..

Anaerobic digestion

View previous topic View next topic Go down

default Anaerobic digestion

Post by John Cossham on 11th April 2011, 7:35 pm

Mr Sfstk8td said

OK, so I got turned onto another question from the thread on SA changing
rules on compost and digestates from food waste and household green
wastes. At first I thought that by digestates they'd meant poo, but
when I read the article in detail, it appears they mean anaerobic
digestates. Well, that makes sense.

So, the question is, what
are the benefits of an anaerobic digestate? I know that fermented
greenstuffs are used for cattle fodder, and this is a type of anaerobic
digestate, but I'm sure what this article is talking about is, at least
functionally, different. The silage doesn't completely break down the
plant mass, just starts the rumination of some of the complex
carbohydrates a bit early, so to speak. The churned, turned and
temperature/humidity controlled industrial anaerobic digestates is a
different kettle of fish though.

What advantages does anaerobic
digestate present for the smallholder? Is it worthwhile to seek a
source for ammendments of this type? Does it make sense, or is it even
possible, to make anaerobic digestates on a small scale? Oh dear, I
believe I've just opened up a new niche for myself.








The thing about AD is that the process extracts usable energy from the materials. Although I'm a fan of composting (and aerobic process) it does only result in a)humus to add to your soil, with some slow-release nutrients, and b)reduced landfill.

But with AD, you get a load of gas, a mix of methane (CH4) and some CO2, H2O and some others, smelly stuff like hydrogen sulphide and mercaptans. This can be cleaned up, leaving the methane, which is able to be burnt to generate heat (and boil water to spin turbines to make electricity, or just boil your kettle at home, or central heating etc) or to go through a fuel cell to make heat and electricity.

And you're left with the digestate, which can be composted aerobically and forms a compost, I'm told, much like any other.

So, what did you want to know?
avatar
John Cossham

Posts : 36
Join date : 2010-01-16
Location : York, UK

http://lowcarbonlifestyle.blogspot.com/

Back to top Go down

default Re: Anaerobic digestion

Post by mr_sfstk8d on 11th April 2011, 8:21 pm

So the AD itself then must be composted for garden use, not applied directly?

There are a few very large corn product distilleries in my area, mostly ethanol for fuel, some potable, i.e. vodka. I was wondering if this steaming pile of mash was suitable to use directly or would take some further post processing before going into the veg patch.
avatar
mr_sfstk8d

Posts : 584
Join date : 2010-12-01
Age : 40
Location : Peoria, IL, US

Back to top Go down

default Re: Anaerobic digestion

Post by John Cossham on 11th April 2011, 10:12 pm

I think that the products of AD should be aerobically composted with other materials first, before use on the garden. However, I have no experience of using AD digestate. I did once get about 200kg spent hops from a brewery, these composted well mixed with the usual diet of shredded twigs, food waste, greengrocers 'resources' etc which I get several times a week.

If you're really interested, I could post the question on the US Composting Council enquiries list that I'm a member of (despite my being in the UK) to ask if raw digestate can be used. PM me if you want me to do this; we can post any answer here, in public.
John
avatar
John Cossham

Posts : 36
Join date : 2010-01-16
Location : York, UK

http://lowcarbonlifestyle.blogspot.com/

Back to top Go down

default Re: Anaerobic digestion

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum