A Homemade Life
Welcome to Homemade Life.

To take full advantage of everything offered by our forum, please log in if you are already a member or join our community if not ....

Who is online?
In total there are 2 users online :: 0 Registered, 0 Hidden and 2 Guests


Most users ever online was 62 on 10th April 2015, 8:24 am
Latest topics
» Seed swap anyone?
by FloBear 15th March 2018, 3:56 pm

» Anyone braving the garden in March ?
by Chilli-head 13th March 2018, 4:35 pm

» Waste collection consultation
by Ploshkin 4th March 2018, 9:20 am

» Hungry Birds
by Dandelion 3rd March 2018, 9:49 pm

» "Popular contents" newsletters
by Dandelion 1st March 2018, 10:45 pm

» Knitting in the round
by Chilli-head 1st March 2018, 5:41 pm

» It's now more difficult to dispose of plastic waste
by Hairyloon 27th February 2018, 1:58 pm

» What can *I* do ?
by Chilli-head 27th February 2018, 11:59 am

» New beginnings in the February garden.
by Chilli-head 26th February 2018, 10:34 am

» Chairs 4 & 5: The lath back / banister back
by Ploshkin 19th February 2018, 9:39 am

» Endangered crafts
by Ploshkin 19th February 2018, 9:36 am

» What are you harvesting today?
by Chilli-head 12th February 2018, 7:52 pm

» The gardener's yearbook
by Chilli-head 1st February 2018, 10:38 am

» Garden Organic
by Dandelion 26th January 2018, 7:24 pm

» New arrivals
by Dandelion 23rd January 2018, 2:48 pm

» A fresh start to 2018 in the January garden
by Dandelion 13th January 2018, 11:23 pm

» More mead ...
by Chilli-head 10th January 2018, 12:47 pm

» Seed Banks and reliable suppliers
by freebird 7th January 2018, 9:37 pm

» Left-overs
by Dandelion 5th January 2018, 10:26 pm

» Recycling Christmas
by Dandelion 5th January 2018, 1:09 pm

We have 633 registered users
The newest registered user is SoberWatersRetreat

Our users have posted a total of 45302 messages in 2350 subjects
HML on FaceBook
RSS feeds

Donate to our Charity
The Homemade life supports Kiva - microloans for people in developing countries working to change their lives.  These loans are repaid to our KIVA account, so your donation is used many times to help different people - literally the gift that keeps on giving..

Oddball tomato

Go down

default Oddball tomato

Post by Chilli-head on 5th June 2013, 11:28 am

While watering my greenhouse tomatoes this morning I noticed something odd. I normally grow a few different varieties, and one of them this year is Harbinger. But one of the plants has always looked a bit odd. I looked over it this morning, at first glance taking in a lot of stems and thinking that there must be side shoots to remove, but no - they are all flower trusses. It has only reaches abour 3' high so far, but has six trusses - I normally only get 4-5 before the plants hit the roof and need pinching out. I await with interest to see how large the fruit get - perhaps it is a cherry type that has found it's way into the wrong packet ? (they are bought seed, and it does not look like any of the others I'm growing either, so not a sowing mistake). Perhaps, with luck, it will be a useful oddity.
Admin and Boss man

Posts : 2477
Join date : 2010-02-23
Location : Bedfordshire

Back to top Go down

default Re: Oddball tomato

Post by Mike on 5th June 2013, 1:59 pm

There are two main sorts of tomato plants, "determinate" and "indeterminate". The difference is whether a fixed number of nodes between flowering points (and a fixed amount the plant will grow) and non fixed (with the plant able to to keep growing and this is the sort you pinch to make branch).

I have limited experience with "determinate" varieties as this is an area where "early blight" (alternaria) is almost always a problem. The determinate varieties are all susceptible but most indeterminate varieties resist as they can regrow leaves. For many sorts of tomato fruits you can get either but it's a problem when you want to make tomato sauces as almost all "paste" varieties are determinate. The solution is to consider "saladette" varieties as many of these are low water/high solids. Although very tiny, "Matts Wild Cherry" (a wild variety collected for use in breeding cherry varities but seed is available) works well for us. Extremely high acid/ high sugar/ high solids (taste as intense as a berry) and since we have been growing for years we have seed that results in larger, somehwhat stronger skins (though not as tough skinned as most cherries). You will never see these fruits in stores as the skins are far too tender. We don't actually make sauce, just remove the tops and freeze whole and then pop a handful or two into any sauce being cooked up.

There is no possibility of social justice on a dead planet except the equality of the grave.

Posts : 485
Join date : 2009-11-08
Age : 73
Location : Step by Step Farm, Berkshire Mtns, Massachusetts, USA

Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum