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Fruit trees for the garden

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default Fruit trees for the garden

Post by AngelinaJellyBeana on 23rd January 2010, 10:12 am

I've got enough room for a couple of smallish fruit trees. I have a "family" apple tree that does well and I was thinking of cherry trees. So does anyone have any recommendations either for good cherries or something else that would be better?
The idea is to make a mini forest garden - I already have black and red current bushes and a couple of gooseberries
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Post by Wilhelm Von Rhomboid on 23rd January 2010, 10:33 am

We have a small but very productive pear tree and a little mulberry tree whihc has a lot of character, if not so much fruit.
Plum/damson are a good idea.

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Post by Robin Wood on 23rd January 2010, 11:04 am

If it was me I would go a second apple tree. Plums are great but tend to fruit heavily one year then nothing for a year or two. Don't know about cherries I am afraid.

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Post by Compostwoman on 23rd January 2010, 12:07 pm

Tayberries are lovely and very prolific also they spread by tip rooting so you get lots of new plants.

Pears are good, too but check, as you may need 2 or more ( diploid/triploid) can't remember off top of head but think that is why I keep the useless Conference pear...so it keeps the wonderous Beth pear going...

I have a useful page somewhere with the needs of fruit trees for partners...if I can find it I shall dig it out later and post the link

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Post by Compostwoman on 23rd January 2010, 12:09 pm



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Post by Compostwoman on 23rd January 2010, 12:11 pm



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Post by Compostwoman on 23rd January 2010, 12:13 pm



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Post by Compostwoman on 23rd January 2010, 12:19 pm

I am thinking of getting more cherry trees so this is a useful link

Cherry tree guide and supplier

We have a Morrello and a stand of sour ( wild) cherry trees...iF we can be bothered to pick them and stone them they make wonderful jam and sauces...but are a so and so to prepare...

The Morello is wonderful but a huge tree, so impossible to net...so we usually get 1 or 2 cherries a year of it....

Hence my interest in the more dwarfing rootstocks at Blackmoor...

Hope this helps AJB

A general top fruit guide is this link
Top fruit guide, includes crab apples and gages.

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Post by polgara on 23rd January 2010, 2:15 pm

I have a Tayberry in a large pot, thpought I would give it a go & see what jappens. Anyone tell me what to prune & when? grow
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Post by AngelinaJellyBeana on 23rd January 2010, 2:23 pm

Thanks for the ideas and links. Plenty to think about and look into

Don't really want another apple, there's only me and I've still got apples from last year stored in various forms.

Don't want anything that gets too tall either so the dwarf varieties are a good idea.

Forgot about damsons, that's a good possibility as they aren't easy to buy round here and even when they are they are expensive and damson jam is one of my faves
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Post by vwalker99999 on 23rd January 2010, 4:16 pm

And then there are nut trees....

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Post by Compostwoman on 23rd January 2010, 4:47 pm

If you want a Damson, we have a Shropshire Prune, which is self fertile...but quite a big tree

but you might like Merryweather

which is a bit more plum like? also self fertile and available on dwarf rootstock?

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Post by Sparhawk on 23rd January 2010, 11:26 pm

polgara wrote:I have a Tayberry in a large pot, thpought I would give it a go & see what jappens. Anyone tell me what to prune & when?

Yes, I think I might have just the book...

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Post by Sparhawk on 23rd January 2010, 11:30 pm

I have put in a small crab apple & a hazel this year...

I'm also hoping to be able to put some sloe & hawthorn so that it inter twines with the existing hedge...

Also having a go with a blackcurrant, red currant, goosegog, rapsberry & I'm hoping to tame the wild bramble this year...

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Post by Dandelion on 16th June 2010, 3:18 pm

Has anyone grown a Jostaberry? I've seen a picture in a catalogue and am feeling quite tempted: it sounds as if it would make great jam. Any advice?

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Post by Guest on 19th June 2010, 10:33 am

Has anyone suggested a Quince tree? If the soil is moist it will do well. Beautiful flowers, smallish tree. Amazing fruit (quince jelly is a major favourite in the family)

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Post by Hairyloon on 19th June 2010, 10:59 am

AngelinaJellyBeana wrote:Don't want anything that gets too tall either so the dwarf varieties are a good idea.
You can always keep cutting the non-dwarf varieties back to keep them small.
Might stimulate fruiting as well, since the tree will think it is under attack.

I think crab-apples are useful to have as they flower early and attract the pollinators... so they are already hanging out in your garden when the real fruit trees flower.
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Post by GB on 25th June 2010, 12:58 am

Can second (or third or fourth) the crab apple. Slow roasted fruit seived through wire mesh colander makes the most amazing jamelly.

How about a few hazelnut bushes that have truffels in their roots?

Oh, and yeh, quince is absolutly amazing, mine had jsut started to fruit when we left it a house or three ago.

Funny thing about planting fruit trees, even after you move on they remain to be loved by their new owners

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Post by Mike on 25th June 2010, 12:09 pm

Hairyloon wrote:
You can always keep cutting the non-dwarf varieties back to keep them small.
Might stimulate fruiting as well, since the tree will think it is under attack.

Before trying this method find out if your sort of tree flowers/bears fruit on "new wood" or "one year old" (spurs). If the former case, controlling tree size by heavy pruning relatively easy and practical. If the latter case, to get any fruit necessary to prune half the tree every year and keeping track relatively difficult and impractical (you need a lot more expertise)

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